COVID-19 Update Turks and Caicos Islands

first_img Oct 16, 2020 Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC COVID-19 Update Turks and Caicos IslandsThe Ministry of Health advises the public that as at 12am on 16th September 2020: the Turks & Caicos Islands has seen some change in its COVID-19 position since the previous update. Nine (9) new cases of covid-19 have been identified, three (3) cases being located on Grand Turk and all…September 18, 2020In “General”COVID-19 Update Turks and Caicos IslandsThe Ministry of Health advises the public that as at 12am on 2nd October 2020: The Turk & Caicos Islands continues to see some changes in its covid-19 position. Over the past 24hrs five new cases of covid-19 have been identified, with four new cases being located on Grand Turk and the…October 5, 2020In “General”COVID-19 Update Turks and Caicos IslandsThe Ministry of Health would like to advise the public that as at 12am on 10th June, 2020: The Turks and Caicos continues to see some change in its covid-19 position. No new positive or suspected cases have been recorded since the previous update. The public is advised to continue following the…June 11, 2020In “General”Share this on WhatsApp Barbados releases new COVID-19 Travel Protocols With the ongoing local testing taking place through the National Public Health Laboratory, including the testing of suspected cases as well as front line workers, it is expected that more positive test results will be received going forward. Oct 16, 2020 Wash your hands frequently with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer (greater than 60% ethanol or 70% isopropanol)Practice social distancing at all times-keeping 6 feet from other personsUse face coverings when in public (must cover mouth and nose)Cover your coughs and sneezes (use your elbow or a tissue which should be properly disposed of)Keep frequently touched surfaces clean e.g.  tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks and ATM machines.Stay home and call the Health Hotlines if you have symptoms of COVID-19 on 232 9444 or 333 0911Avoid contact with others who are sick The general public is reminded to take the following precautions to protect themselves and others;  The newly reported case was identified in the community. The individual has been quarantined and will be managed in the community along with their immediate contacts. The Public Health team will be conducting contact tracing in order to identify any other persons who are close contacts in order to test and quarantine them.center_img You may be interested in… Oct 15, 2020 CARPHA Partners with, PAHO to Ensure Caribbean States’… Another new case of COVID-19 is being reported by the Ministry of Health. The Turks and Caicos Islands now has a total of sixteen (16) cases of COVID-19 with 10 recoveries, 1 death, one person who left the country and 4 active cases. CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak Stay informed about COVID-19, visit the Ministry of Health’s website: https://www.gov.tc/moh/coronavirus/ Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Oct 16, 2020last_img read more

Keppel and Jan De Nul Sign Contracts for Three New Dredgers

first_imgKeppel Singmarine Pte Ltd (Keppel Singmarine) has secured contracts from Jan De Nul Group to build three trailing suction hopper dredgers (TSHDs).The contracts for the construction of three TSHDs are worth around $73.7 million in total.To be built to Jan De Nul’s design, the dredgers will be able to dredge to a maximum depth of 27.6m, and have a hopper capacity of 3,500 m³.The two dredgers will be built to the requirements of classification society, Bureau Veritas, in Keppel Nantong Shipyard, a subsidiary of Keppel O&M.Mr Abu Bakar, Managing Director of Keppel Singmarine, said, “Across the group, we have undertaken a number of newbuild dredger projects as well as repairs for customers such as Jan De Nul. We are always on the lookout to add value to our customers and markets, and this project is a natural extension of Keppel Singmarine’s strong track record and expertise in specialized vessels.”The first two dredgers are expected to be completed in the second half of 2018 while construction of the third dredger will require a notice within six months from JDN to exercise the option for the dredger.last_img read more

Get carta

first_imgA good rule in life is never get into a dispute with the master of the rolls on the subject of Magna Carta (did she die in vain?). The topic provided some light relief in the Court of Appeal’s ruling last week on the eviction of the Occupy camp at St Paul’s Churchyard. One of the appellants, Paul Randle-Jolliffe, had challenged the High Court’s eviction ruling on the ground that, as a ‘Magna Carta heir’, it did not apply to him. The master of the rolls gave these ‘rather esoteric arguments’ short shrift. While chapter 29 of the Magna Carta (the 1297 version) ‘is seen by many as the historical foundation for the rule of law in England… it has no bearing on the arguments in this case’. It gets worse. The appellant also cited chapters 1 and 9 of the document, which assert the rights and liberties of the English church and the City of London – the very two institutions supporting the eviction. As the judgment dryly observes, the two clauses ‘cannot help the defendants’.last_img read more

The Olympics: Setting the standard

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

JSL Global handles shipment amid Covid-19 disruption

first_imgThe shipment consisted of two CO2 tanks, each with dimensions of 18 m x 4.2 m x 3.5 m and weighed 41 tonnes.Jigar Shah, director of projects at JSL Global, reported that the operation team coordinating this project faced multiple challenges, including disruptions due to Covid-19. The majority of the team was working from home and only a few members were present during the project move.JSL Global is a member of the Worldwide Project Consortium (WWPC), representing Qatar.www.wwpc.eu.comwww.jsl-global.netlast_img

Grieve acts on plea over unrepresented defendants

first_imgThe attorney general’s office has confirmed that Dominic Grieve QC has appointed an amicus curiae to assist the court on legal argument expected to be made on behalf of defendants facing trial without representation.The appointment of the ‘advocate to the court’ follows a request made by the Crown court judge dealing with the case.A spokeswoman for Grieve (pictured) explained: ‘The advocate is not instructed by the attorney general, but is there to provide legal advice and analysis to the court.’  In this case, she said, the advocate has been asked to assist the court in determining whether as a matter of law an unrepresented defendant could receive a fair trial.  ‘The advocate will not be engaging in any matter that will form part of the trial in due course, they will only be advising on this preliminary legal issue,’ she said.Barristers in some of the most complex cases have refused to undertake legal aid work following 30% cuts in fees last December as part of the government’s legal aid budget cuts.Today, barristers and solicitors across the country will stage an all-day protest in opposition to the cuts. They will not attend court, but will attend demonstrations, marches and training days.last_img read more

Listed firm ‘continuously’ talking about new acquisitions

first_imgAdrian BilesAdrian Biles, chief executive, said: ‘We expect to achieve significant further growth during the year from additional acquisitions, together with organic growth arising principally from the increasing cross-referral of clients between the group’s businesses and as the more specialised businesses take advantage of the group’s full service capabilities. We continuously examine expansion opportunities and are engaged in discussions with firms in a number of other international jurisdictions. In the UK, we have a good pipeline of potential acquisitions with which we are at various stages of discussion or negotiation.’Biles owns 26.7% of the company and received £245,000 through salary and profit shares in 2018 (up from £200,000 in 2017).The group was admitted to the AIM market of the London stock exchange last year. It committed £20m to acquisitions last year and has spent just over half that figure so far.Biles stressed that further acquisitions will not be dictated by the financial performance of the firm but by the quality of those working within it. ‘High quality businesses may well be struggling with issues of size, strategy and how to best finance themselves’, said Biles. ‘From our perspective it is about giving them access to capital and reserves.’Gordon Dadds receives more than two-thirds of its income through the practice areas of corporate and tax, dispute resolution and real estate work.The firm has increased its staff numbers from 177 to 229 and now has 107 fee earners. Staff costs rose from £7.7m in 2017 to £10.8m in 2017/18. A newly listed firm reporting healthy profit increases said today there will be no let-up in its acquisition spree. Gordon Dadds Group plc bought five professional services businesses in 2017/18 but said today that further opportunities for expansion are continuously under discussion, with targets are likely to be businesses in the UK and internationally with at least £10m annual income.In its maiden results, the firm posted pre-tax profits up 23.3% to £2.96m on revenue of £31.2m (up 25.3%) for the year ending 31 March. Its share price rose more than 6% on the announcement. Shareholders will receive a dividend of 4p per share. last_img read more

Utah to pioneer non-lawyer ownership in US first

first_imgUtah has become the first US state to allow non-lawyer ownership of law firms in a move aimed at improving access to justice. The state’s Supreme Court last week approved a two-year pilot of a regulatory sandbox, the Office of Legal Innovation, which would license new forms of legal services providers.In a statement, Utah Supreme Court Justice Deno Himonas said changes will enable individuals and entities to explore creative ways to safely allow lawyers and non-lawyers to practise law and to reduce constraints on how lawyers market and promote services. New forms of providers could include partnerships, corporations and companies and non-profit organisations partnering with other entities to offer legal services.Utah is well down the list of state bars by size, with only 26 lawyers per 10,000 residents compared with 92 in New York and 43 in California. However the pilot will be closely watched by other states considering introducing new forms of ownership, including England-and-Wales-style alternative business structures. In February this year, the American Bar Association approved a resolution encouraging states and other jurisdictions ‘to consider innovative approaches to expanding access to justice with the goal of improving affordability and quality of civil legal services’.last_img read more

Track monitoring on the TGV network

first_imgINTRO: To maintain high standards of ride on high speed lines with growing traffic, it is essential to improve monitoring of track components. SNCF has put in hand development of more powerful monitoring equipment, including a video rail surface inspection system in service since the start of this year. The case for a dedicated TGV infrastructure inspection train is stronger as further high speed routes near completionBYLINE: André Le BihanHead of Maintenance Policy, Infrastructure Division, SNCFIN the course of almost 20 years of commercial TGV operation at speeds up to 300 km/h, SNCF engineers have developed a comprehensive system for monitoring track condition on high speed lines and planning scheduled maintenance. A computer-based decision-support system is the main planning tool, supplied with a wide range of recording data gathered during periodic inspections and special visits.The general principles of track monitoring and maintenance are the same for conventional and high speed lines, with the engineer striving to maintain the required standards of track geometry at the lowest possible cost. However, the higher dynamic forces experienced on high speed lines tend to accelerate the rate at which defects worsen. To maintain high safety and passenger comfort standards, SNCF has therefore developed a more intensive inspection programme for high speed routes (Table I).Track geometry on high speed lines is monitored using Mauzin recording cars operating at speeds up to 200 km/h, which provide numerical and graphical data for the detection and short-term correction of short wave defects. These cars are also equipped to produce charts with an extended baseline so that long-wave defects can be analysed. It is vital that such defects are mastered if standards of ride quality are to be maintained at high speeds.Work to correct and maintain track geometry is planned on a long-term basis using data provided by the recording cars. Longitudinal level, transverse level and alignment are calculated on board and fed into the database for the route in question. Further processing enables tamping operations to be planned to optimum effect.Every two weeks, high speed lines are inspected for isolated defects by the test car Mélusine, which is marshalled in a service train and operates at line speed. Accelerometers installed in the car measure horizontal and vertical acceleration at bogie and car body level, and a recently-developed processing system provides automatic analysis of peak values with their location. Isolated defects are then corrected, mainly using multi-purpose tampers allocated to light maintenance work.The ultimate development of the Mélusine concept would be a dedicated high-speed infrastructure inspection train, which as well as track geometry and ride quality would monitor the signalling and overhead electrification systems. As the French high speed network grows and traffic levels rise, the economic case for such a train becomes even stronger, and SNCF has decided to study a project to have such a train in service by 2005.InspectionVisual inspection of track components is undertaken every 10 weeks during a maintenance window, as it can be hard to verify the condition of components from the lineside or just using train-borne video equipment. Until now, TGV routes have been closed to traffic for around 90min during daylight hours to allow inspection work to take place, but commercial pressures mean that this traditional maintenance window is getting shorter.To inspect plain line at night, we have been considering the introduction of specialised vehicles equipped with powerful spot lights. Although automatic monitoring systems are being installed on the high speed route between Paris and Marseille, sensitive and complex components such as the moving noses of switches and crossings will still require visual inspection in daylight, particularly if cracking is to be detected and monitored. The minimum time to allow for this task would appear to be 60min.Most track maintenance work on a modern high speed line is generated by the interaction of wheel on rail, which has important consequences for rail life, track geometry and rolling noise. On the busiest sections of the high speed network, rail is inspected every six months using an ultrasonic testing car. Internal fatigue defects are rare due to the high quality of the rail steel employed and of the welds, as well as the maximum static axleload of 17 tonnes in force on the new lines. At a maximum speed of 70 km/h, the use of ultrasonic cars can hinder other maintenance work, and further acceleration of this inspection process would be welcome.Although rail corrugation has never been observed on the French high speed network, probably due to the high rolling stability of TGV bogies and good elastic behaviour on the part of the track, surface defects resulting from rolling contact fatigue are a cause for concern. They are very difficult to detect by ultrasound and can cause multiple rail breaks (RG 12.00 p810). Having first appeared as squats on straight track, these defects are now giving rise to head checks on the running edge of the upper rail in large radius curves, including junctions and crossovers on high speed lines. A special programme of inspections must be followed to monitor the development of these defects, and new methods of preventative maintenance based on special grinding profiles are currently under development.High speed videoThe running surface geometry of the rail may be damaged locally by other phenomena, such as the crushing of ballast particles by ice falling from trains in winter. Since January 2001, a rail surface inspection system known as Ivoire has been in service at speeds up to 300 km/h, installed underneath the test car Mélusine. High speed routes will be inspected on a regular basis every three months, but additional inspections may take place if required.Ivoire comprises a digital camera mounted above each rail, capable of processing up to 20million pixels each second. Defects as small as 1mm are clearly visible at 300 km/h, and there is sufficient memory for 2h 30min of continuous recording. Data captured during recording runs is processed by a separate facility, and is presented in two formats. The number of defects per km can be presented in graphical form, with each defect classified into one of four categories depending on its magnitude. For each defect falling into Category 4, the most serious, a separate file is produced containing an image of the fault an its exact location. This enables the most appropriate course of action to be taken.Mélusine is now also capable of measuring rolling noise in the 1000 to 5000Hz spectrum, by means of microphones mounted under the bogies. Rail defects have their particular noise signature, with the frequency of the sound inversely proportional to the wavelength of the fault that generated it. Correlated with very precise measurement of the rail head, these measurements enable a map of rolling noise to be produced, which will be developed to guide grinding operations.Since the opening of the first section of the Paris – Lyon route in 1981, a track geometry database has been maintained for high speed lines, expanding with the development of the TGV network. In addition, specialised software has been developed to manage maintenance tasks, such as Timon for tamping and grinding, or Defrail for rail maintenance. The track monitoring system for TGV routes is not in itself revolutionary, but through collating considerable amounts of physical data and improving methods and tools continually, we have been able to provide high track quality at low cost. nIN the course of almost 20 years of commercial TGV operation at speeds up to 300 km/h, SNCF engineers have developed a comprehensive system for monitoring track condition on high speed lines and planning scheduled maintenance. A computer-based decision-support system is the main planning tool, supplied with a wide range of recording data gathered during periodic inspections and special visits.The general principles of track monitoring and maintenance are the same for conventional and high speed lines, with the engineer striving to maintain the required standards of track geometry at the lowest possible cost. However, the higher dynamic forces experienced on high speed lines tend to accelerate the rate at which defects worsen. To maintain high safety and passenger comfort standards, SNCF has therefore developed a more intensive inspection programme for high speed routes (Table I).Track geometry on high speed lines is monitored using Mauzin recording cars operating at speeds up to 200 km/h, which provide numerical and graphical data for the detection and short-term correction of short wave defects. These cars are also equipped to produce charts with an extended baseline so that long-wave defects can be analysed. It is vital that such defects are mastered if standards of ride quality are to be maintained at high speeds.Work to correct and maintain track geometry is planned on a long-term basis using data provided by the recording cars. Longitudinal level, transverse level and alignment are calculated on board and fed into the database for the route in question. Further processing enables tamping operations to be planned to optimum effect.Every two weeks, high speed lines are inspected for isolated defects by the test car Mélusine, which is marshalled in a service train and operates at line speed. Accelerometers installed in the car measure horizontal and vertical acceleration at bogie and car body level, and a recently-developed processing system provides automatic analysis of peak values with their location. Isolated defects are then corrected, mainly using multi-purpose tampers allocated to light maintenance work.The ultimate development of the Mélusine concept would be a dedicated high-speed infrastructure inspection train, which as well as track geometry and ride quality would monitor the signalling and overhead electrification systems. As the French high speed network grows and traffic levels rise, the economic case for such a train becomes even stronger, and SNCF has decided to study a project to have such a train in service by 2005.InspectionVisual inspection of track components is undertaken every 10 weeks during a maintenance window, as it can be hard to verify the condition of components from the lineside or just using train-borne video equipment. Until now, TGV routes have been closed to traffic for around 90min during daylight hours to allow inspection work to take place, but commercial pressures mean that this traditional maintenance window is getting shorter.To inspect plain line at night, we have been considering the introduction of specialised vehicles equipped with powerful spot lights. Although automatic monitoring systems are being installed on the high speed route between Paris and Marseille, sensitive and complex components such as the moving noses of switches and crossings will still require visual inspection in daylight, particularly if cracking is to be detected and monitored. The minimum time to allow for this task would appear to be 60min.Most track maintenance work on a modern high speed line is generated by the interaction of wheel on rail, which has important consequences for rail life, track geometry and rolling noise. On the busiest sections of the high speed network, rail is inspected every six months using an ultrasonic testing car. Internal fatigue defects are rare due to the high quality of the rail steel employed and of the welds, as well as the maximum static axleload of 17 tonnes in force on the new lines. At a maximum speed of 70 km/h, the use of ultrasonic cars can hinder other maintenance work, and further acceleration of this inspection process would be welcome.Although rail corrugation has never been observed on the French high speed network, probably due to the high rolling stability of TGV bogies and good elastic behaviour on the part of the track, surface defects resulting from rolling contact fatigue are a cause for concern. They are very difficult to detect by ultrasound and can cause multiple rail breaks (RG 12.00 p810). Having first appeared as squats on straight track, these defects are now giving rise to head checks on the running edge of the upper rail in large radius curves, including junctions and crossovers on high speed lines. A special programme of inspections must be followed to monitor the development of these defects, and new methods of preventative maintenance based on special grinding profiles are currently under development.High speed videoThe running surface geometry of the rail may be damaged locally by other phenomena, such as the crushing of ballast particles by ice falling from trains in winter. Since January 2001, a rail surface inspection system known as Ivoire has been in service at speeds up to 300 km/h, installed underneath the test car Mélusine. High speed routes will be inspected on a regular basis every three months, but additional inspections may take place if required.Ivoire comprises a digital camera mounted above each rail, capable of processing up to 20million pixels each second. Defects as small as 1mm are clearly visible at 300 km/h, and there is sufficient memory for 2h 30min of continuous recording. Data captured during recording runs is processed by a separate facility, and is presented in two formats. The number of defects per km can be presented in graphical form, with each defect classified into one of four categories depending on its magnitude. For each defect falling into Category 4, the most serious, a separate file is produced containing an image of the fault an its exact location. This enables the most appropriate course of action to be taken.Mélusine is now also capable of measuring rolling noise in the 1000 to 5000Hz spectrum, by means of microphones mounted under the bogies. Rail defects have their particular noise signature, with the frequency of the sound inversely proportional to the wavelength of the fault that generated it. Correlated with very precise measurement of the rail head, these measurements enable a map of rolling noise to be produced, which will be developed to guide grinding operations.Since the opening of the first section of the Paris – Lyon route in 1981, a track geometry database has been maintained for high speed lines, expanding with the development of the TGV network. In addition, specialised software has been developed to manage maintenance tasks, such as Timon for tamping and grinding, or Defrail for rail maintenance. The track monitoring system for TGV routes is not in itself revolutionary, but through collating considerable amounts of physical data and improving methods and tools continually, we have been able to provide high track quality at low cost. nTable I. Frequency of track inspectionTABLE: Type Conventional routes, High speed lines, max speed 160 to 220 km/h max speed 300 km/hOn-foot inspection 2 weeks Plain line 1 10 weeksby gang foreman Switches & crossings 5 weeks Formation/structures 2 5 weeksGeneral inspection by district managerOn foot 2 months 1 monthFrom train cab 2 weeks 2 weeksSpecial inspection Daily on line opening, at 160 km/hTrack recording car 6 months 3 months 3Accelerometer recordings 6 months 4 2 weeks 5Ultrasonic rail inspection 12 months 6 months1. Undertaken during daylight maintenance windows, or at night on foot or from inspection trolleys2. Inspection of fencing, ditches, earthworks and other structures undertaken in daylight from outside the right of way3. Using an extended baseline to analyse long wave defects4. Using a portable device5. Using test car MélusineCAPTION: Top: Monitoring heads for the Ivoire equipment are mounted in protective cases below the Mélusine recording carCAPTION: Still photograph of a rail surface defect (left) and an image from the Ivoire video system taken at 300 km/h CAPTION: Fig 1. Analysis of track faults by category as recorded by Ivoire during a run on TGV Nord in December 2000Track monitoring on the TGV networkTo ensure high standards of ride and comfort on high speed lines with growing traffic, French National Railways is improving its monitoring and track measurement techniques. These include a video rail surface inspection system able to operate at up to 300 km/h that has been in use since January. Plans are now advancing for a dedicated high speed inspection train that would enter service in 2005Surveillance continue de la voie sur le réseau TGVAfin de s’assurer d’un haut niveau de roulement et de confort sur les lignes à grande vitesse dont le trafic s’accroît, la SNCF améliore ses techniques de surveillance et de mesure de la voie. Parmi elles, on note un système vidéo d’inspection de la surface des rails pouvant fonctionner jusqu’à 300 km/h, employé depuis janvier. Les projets avancent désormais vers la création d’une rame d’inspection spécialisée, à grande vitesse, qui entrerait en service en 2005Gleisüberwachung auf dem TGV-NetzZur Sicherstellung eines guten Fahrverhaltens und des Komforts auf den Hochgeschwindigkeitsstrecken bei zunehmenden Verkehr verbessert die SNCF Überwachungs- und Gleismessverfahren. Dies umfasst unter Anderem ein Video-Schienen-Prüfsystem, welches mit Geschwindigkeiten bis zu 300 km/h eingesetzt werden kann, und sich seit Januar im Einsatz befindet. Es bestehen Pläne, einen Hochgeschwindigkeitsmesszug zu bauen, welcher 2005 in Betrieb kommen klast_img read more

Lighting improved at high speed train depot

first_imgUK: Two maintenance tracks at Eurostar’s high speed train depot in east London have been equipped with LED lighting supplied by J Brand Ltd.This has replaced fluorescent lighting, providing a better a quality of light to help improve working conditions and staff safety. ‘The benefits will really be seen in winter, when the improvement will be very clear’, the supplier told Railway Gazette International.The lighting is activated by PIR sensors, with the lights turning on and off automatically as staff progress along the length of the 400 m trainsets.LEDs also use less energy than the older lights and have lower maintenance requirements, which the supplier expects will bring a significant reduction in costs for Eurostar as well as offering environmental benefits.last_img