CSA plans online investment fraud awareness campaign

Imposters among us, CSA warns Don’t believe the hype: BCSC proposes new rules for stock promoters Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Related news IE Staff Keywords Fraud,  Investor protection,  Investment scamsCompanies Canadian Securities Administrators Share this article and your comments with peers on social media To cap off Investor Education Month, Canadian securities regulators Monday announced the launch of a new online fraud awareness campaign to start in November. The online campaign is designed to target those Canadians who are enticed by slick online fraudulent investment opportunities. “Our enforcement teams across the country have firsthand knowledge of how unscrupulous promoters are turning to the internet to market their fraudulent investment opportunities and the threat these online investment scams pose to Canadian investors,” says Bill Rice, chair of the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) and chair and CEO of the Alberta Securities Commission. “Canadian securities regulators felt it was important to tackle these tactics head on and educate potential investors in the same spaces where fraudsters solicit their victims.” The online public education initiative will include online advertisements and social media promotions that point to a video and website of a fictitious company, BlueHedge Investments, to illustrate how scam artists use these tools to lure unsuspecting investors in cyberspace. Soon after people land on the fictitious company’s website, they are redirected to an educational website to help them recognize, avoid and report investment scams they might find online or via social media. “The red flags we highlight in the campaign are based on techniques that we have observed tech-savvy fraudsters commonly use when soliciting victims online,” says Rice. “Our objective is to reach these potential investors and arm them with information to avoid investment fraud so they don’t become a victim of these cyber scams.” CSA members involved in the initiative include the Alberta Securities Commission, the Autorité des marchés financiers of Québec, the British Columbia Securities Commission, the Financial Services Regulation Division of Newfoundland and Labrador, the New Brunswick Securities Commission, the Northwest Territories Securities Office, the Nova Scotia Securities Commission, the Nunavut Securities Office, the Prince Edward Island Securities Office, the Saskatchewan Financial Services Commission, and the Yukon Securities Registry. The campaign will run mid-November 2011 to mid-February 2012. OSC finalizes DSC ban read more

U.S. inflation slowed in December

first_img Another jump in prices tightens the squeeze on U.S. consumers Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Associated Press Keywords Inflation,  United States Stagflation is U.S. economists’ biggest fear, SIFMA sayscenter_img U.S. economy is warming up, but unlikely to overheat: Moody’s Over the past 12 months, overall inflation is up 2.1% while core inflation, which excludes volatile food and energy costs, rose 1.8%. The overall 2.1% price increase was identical to the inflation gain in 2016 with both years up from tiny increases of 0.8% in 2014 and 0.7% in 2015. Low inflation has made the U.S. Federal Reserve cautious about raising interest rates too quickly. After maintaining a benchmark policy rate at a record low near zero for seven years, the Fed started gradually raising rates in December 2015 with one quarter-point hike, and another in 2016. The Fed last year accelerated that pace, raising rates three times and signalling at its meeting last month that it expected to raise rates at the same clip this year. However, economists believe the central bank may be forced to accelerate that pace if there are hints that inflation is beginning to rise more rapidly, given that unemployment continues to hover at 17-year lows. Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics, said that the December report, with a 0.3% rise in core prices, the largest in 11 months, bolstered his view that the Fed will accelerate rate increases this year. He said he expected the next rate hike to occur in March with a total of four hikes this year. He said this forecast was based on a view that inflation will begin to show bigger gains in coming months. “Once spring comes around … the big declines in components like wireless telephone services will drop out of the annual calculation and the core inflation rate will rebound well above 2%,” Ashworth said. For December, energy prices fell 1.2% after surging 3.9% in November. The December decline was led by a 2.7% drop in the price of gasoline, which had jumped 7.3% in November. Currently, the nationwide average for gas is $2.52, up from $2.35 a year ago, according to AAA. The government figures show that gas prices are up 6.9% from December 2016. Food costs edged up 0.2% in December and are up a modest 1.6% over the past year. Core inflation rose 0.3% in December with core prices up 1.8% over the past 12 months. Clothing costs are one key sector bucking the trend of higher prices. Clothing costs have fallen the past four months are down 1.6% over the past year. Consumer inflation in the United States slowed in December to a tiny 0.1% gain as energy costs retreated from a big jump in November. The December increase in American consumer prices followed a sharper 0.4% increase in November, the U.S. Labor Department reported Friday. The December gain was the smallest advance since October. Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

CRA audit incentives lead to poor taxpayer outcomes, study suggests

first_imghand grabbing money bag samuaritop/123RF Rudy Mezzetta Increasing pressure on the Canada Revenue Agency to raise tax revenue, as well as the structure of the CRA’s internal performance targets, may be contributing to poorer quality tax audits, according to a study published by the C.D. Howe Institute on Thursday. The study explored CRA audit incentives, such as its “fiscal impact” metric, which includes tax assessed, tax refunds reduced, interest and penalties, but doesn’t include the impact of appeals, reversals and uncollected amounts. The structure of the fiscal impact metric could create an incentive for the CRA to increase assessed amounts because reversals are not reported, the study suggested. Keywords Tax auditsCompanies Canada Revenue Agency O’Toole calls for pause on CRA audits for businesses struggling due to Covid-19 Crypto firm strikes client disclosure deal with CRA The study’s authors recommended:  that reversals of assessments be included in the definition of “fiscal impact”; that the CRA put a greater focus on its “validated risk” metric to determine “overall compliance and confidence that taxes will voluntarily be paid,” and less focus on fiscal impact;that linking the CRA’s fiscal impact and the estimated tax gap be avoided.  The authors of the study also recommended that governments “resist the urge to pay for Covid-19 measures and the loss of tax revenues” by putting even greater pressure on the CRA to raise revenue via aggressive audits.   “The CRA is already under pressures that are creating poor outcomes for taxpayers,” the authors wrote. “We fear that further strengthening of CRA’s incentives to collect taxes will adversely affect the CRA’s ability to work with taxpayers to create a tax system that will flourish as the economy recovers.” The study’s authors said that nearly $1 billion in increased funding the CRA received in the 2016 and 2017 federal budgets came with explicit expectations from the government that the CRA raise $5 of tax revenue for every $1 of expense. This represented a significant increase from the CRA’s historical rate of tax revenue “return” relative to expense, and potentially amplified the effect of incentives created by the CRA’s performance metrics, the study suggested.  In addition, the government’s recent focus on calculating and reporting Canada’s tax gap —  the theoretical gap between tax that might be collected if all taxpayers were compliant and actual tax revenue collected — has in turn put “further pressure on the [CRA] audit division to assess more corporate income tax” to shrink the gap. Drawing on previous academic research from Kenneth Klassen, who co-authored the study, C.D. Howe suggested that “some auditors may, perhaps unconsciously, be auditing in ways that satisfy the evaluation system used by CRA rather than with a view to the fairest amount of tax due.”As evidence, the study’s authors cite 2016 and 2018 reports from the Auditor General of Canada that “raise questions about the quality of CRA audits and the audit process.” In particular, the study noted that “data provided by the auditor general show a trend for CRA to close files and assess additional taxes toward year-end. Based on the monthly average of reassessments issued in the five-year period ended March 31, 2018, the auditor general reports that almost 40 percent of audit files were closed in February and March,” just before the CRA’s deadline to meet its annual targets by its fiscal year end. The auditor general report also showed that the CRA could not accurately report the result of its compliance activity, and that the revenue results were significantly less than what the government had estimated. “Overstating the results of its compliance activities is consistent with the types of behaviour that is driven by the incentives CRA faces,” the authors of the C.D. Howe study wrote.  Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media CRA, RQ should be held liable for auditor mistakes, CFIB says Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Boeing Marks 35 Years of Field Reps with U.S. Army Apaches, Looks Forward to Another Five

first_imgBoeing Marks 35 Years of Field Reps with U.S. Army Apaches, Looks Forward to Another Five Boeing’s [NYSE: BA] latest contract from the U.S. Army continues to build on a legacy of customer field support for the Army’s AH-64 Apache. Under the projected five-year, $83.3 million max indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity agreement, 15 Boeing field service representatives will be dedicated to the U.S. Army’s Apache fleet.Boeing has provided field service representatives (FSR) for the U.S. Apache since 1985. Working side by side with Apache operators and maintainers, FSRs are located across the U.S. and deployed with Army units at international locations. The contract includes a base award and four option years.“Our field reps continue to be the direct, on-site technical expertise for Apache operators,” said John Chicoli, director of U.S. Army, Special Operations and Vertical Lift Services for Boeing. “Side by side with the customer, they bring access to the entire Boeing network for troubleshooting, complex maintenance support and training the warfighter.”Boeing’s Apache FSR team includes 100% veterans of the U.S. military, with 90% having supported Apaches during their military career. FSRs are a direct link to the latest Boeing proprietary technical documents and have instant access to Boeing engineering to supplement technical and maintenance manuals. Boeing FSRs provide critical technical support, innovation, training and cost savings as they work shoulder to shoulder with their United States government counterparts.Boeing is the world’s largest aerospace company and leading provider of commercial airplanes, defense, space and security systems, and global services. As a top U.S. exporter, the company supports commercial and government customers in more than 150 countries, leveraging the talents of a global supplier base. Building on a legacy of aerospace leadership, Boeing continues to lead in technology and innovation, deliver for its customers and invest in its people and future growth. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Aerospace, agreement, Award, Boeing, building, career, Engineering, future, Government, innovation, military, security, space, technology, United States, worldlast_img read more

Mid-tier businesses confident, KPMG Enterprise pre-Budget survey finds

first_imgMid-tier businesses confident, KPMG Enterprise pre-Budget survey finds KPMGAustralia’s mid-market businesses are upbeat, and markedly less worried about the ending of the JobKeeper program than they were six months ago, KPMG Enterprise’s annual pre-Budget survey finds.The survey of 100 mid-tier business leaders and directors found two-thirds (68 percent) had either used government support mechanisms through COVID and were ’emerging with confidence’, or said that new opportunities had emerged as a direct result of the past year’s experience. Less than half said that COVID or other factors had negatively impacted the business.Only one-third expected the recent ending of the JobKeeper scheme to lead to a significant decline in economic activity and higher unemployment. This compared to two-thirds in the equivalent KPMG Enterprise survey just ahead of the October Budget last year. Almost one-half had used JobKeeper and one-third the instant asset write-off scheme.The biggest challenge seen by mid-market businesses was once again cost and margin pressures, followed by supply chain problems, then recruiting skilled staff. Reduced revenue and demand, and changes to consumer spending were also prominent issues.In terms of paying back Australia’s COVID-related debts, raising productivity resulting in revenue growth was strongly favoured over tax increases. Tax reform was considered key to this achieving this extra productivity. But if any single tax had to rise, then GST was the most nominated option.Clive Bird, KPMG Enterprise National Tax Leader said: “It is heartening to see Australia’s mid-tier sector, the backbone of the national economy, feeling upbeat and a lot less fearful about the ending of JobKeeper than they were six months ago. Many have accessed government support schemes over the past year and are now emerging with confidence.”“A significant number have taken advantage of the Instant Asset Write-off and plan to do so with the R&D Tax Incentive, both of which are encouraging signs for future growth and innovation. It was also positive to see strong support for innovation measures like the early stage investor incentive; innovation tax incentive; software-specific development and collaboration premiums.”He added: ‘While nobody wants tax rises, it is clear that if there has to be one, then GST was the option chosen by respondents. This is consistent with our last survey. This is difficult territory but there is a clear business view that tax reform is needed and we need to move away from Australia’s over-reliance on direct taxes.”The large debts and emergence from COVID mean that a ramp-up in ATO compliance activity has commenced and the survey found half of businesses concerned about this. ATO programs directed at the top 500 and ‘next 5000’ privately-owned groups, as part of the wider ‘Justified Trust’ tax assurance program aimed at Australian businesses and wealthy family groups, are in full swing.Clive Bird said: “It is concerning that nearly half of businesses believe they are well prepared for the additional compliance activity – yet nearly two-thirds say they do not currently have documented tax risk management frameworks. This is a key part of proper tax governance as the ATO sees it and I think there may be a degree of unfounded optimism about the readiness of many businesses and family groups.“I can understand reluctance to invest in documenting tax risk management procedures where taxpayers don’t see an immediate value add – but this is now a clear expectation from the ATO, and a key focus of each review program. Given the ATO focus on tax governance and justified trust, documentation is essential but relatively few taxpayer groups are prepared.”Other survey findings showed significant support for ownership succession to take place in family businesses without tax, and for the two-tiered company tax rate system to remain until finances allowed the higher rate for larger companies to come down.Clive Bird said: “It is curious that the Australian tax system effectively penalises organised succession planning in family companies while the owner is alive yet there is no tax impact on transfer when they die. KPMG research* has shown that Australia is an outlier in this respect, and we need to change our approach to give a boost to family-owned enterprises – which comprise around two-thirds of all businesses – as they emerge from COVID.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:ATO, audit, Australia, Australian, business, Clive, Government, GST, innovation, Investor, JobKeeper, KPMG, optimism, spending, supply chain, taxpayer, unemploymentlast_img read more

Clark County Auto License closed for in-person services

first_imgClark County Auto License closed for in-person servicesPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Wednesday, March 18, 2020in: Community Newsshare 0 The auditor will re-evaluate on April 13 to determine a date to re-open the officeVANCOUVER — Clark County Auditor Greg Kimsey announced Wednesday that the Auto License office at 1408 Franklin St. will close for in-person services beginning at noon today, March 18.The closure is due to concerns regarding the COVID-19 virus. The auditor will re-evaluate on April 13 to determine a date to re-open the office.“The safety of our customers and staff is my utmost concern,” said Auditor Kimsey. “This closure will help us follow the social distancing guidelines that are so important in our community right now.”Auto License staff will continue to process mail-in and on-line renewals to be mailed to customers. On-line renewals can be processed through https://www.dol.wa.gov/vehicleregistration/renewyourtabs.html.All licensing subagents are continuing to be open for business and they can be found at www.clarkautolicense.org.If you have title work that has been submitted to our office, call (564) 397-2288.Information provided by Clark Co. WA Communications.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyCovid-19Vancouvershare 0 Previous : Camas Police officer involved in shooting identified Next : Superior Court updates modifications to operations in response to COVID-19 concernsAdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

CU-Boulder Sources On Kobe Bryant Sexual Assault Case

first_imgNEWS TIP SHEET Media hype surrounding the Kobe Bryant sexual assault case raises issues of accuracy and fairness in reporting, according Meg Moritz, an associate professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Colorado at Boulder. “In these cases, excess news coverage is almost assured and one of the bottom line issues is whether the media can be fair to the accuser,” said Moritz. “The Internet further complicates the issue because all kinds of personal details that might not otherwise be in mainstream media are all over the Web and you wonder if newspaper and TV reporters will ignore this information. It puts serious journalists in a real bind.” Moritz, a former television news producer, studies ethical issues facing journalists who cover high-profile cases. She is available for comment at (303) 492-1610. Also available for comment are: * Patricia Raybon, an associate professor of journalism who studies race and ethnicity issues in the media. Raybon can be reached at (303) 492-4188. * Paul Campos, a professor of law and a syndicated columnist for the Scripps Howard News Service, can comment on criminal justice and legal theory. In a recent column, Campos criticized the way rape cases are prosecuted in Colorado and believes “the politics of rape” have contaminated the legal system. Campos can be reached at (303) 492-6053. Also see his column in the Rocky Mountain News, “The new politics of rape.” * Christopher Mueller, a professor of law, can address trial procedure and the rules of evidence. His phone number is (303) 492-6973. * Meg Campbell, an assistant professor of marketing in CU-Boulder’s Leeds School of Business, can speak about how marketers make decisions on spokespeople, particularly regarding product endorsements. She can be reached at (303) 735-6305. For assistance, contact Dirk Martin at the CU-Boulder Office of News Services at (303) 492-3140. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Aug. 12, 2003 last_img read more

From the dean of students: Welcome, graduate students!

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Aug. 31, 2018 As your new dean of students, it is my honor to welcome you to a new academic year at CU Boulder!Like some of you, I just moved to Colorado in August. My last position was with the University of California, Irvine, where I held several Student Affairs leadership roles working with undergraduate and graduate student governments, student media and student organizations. I am very excited to be here and be a part of the Boulder community.Whether you are just beginning your graduate studies here or you are working towards finishing your program this year, we are glad you are here. Graduate students are a critical component to the CU Boulder campus community. Between your research, involvement on campus and interactions with undergraduate students, CU Boulder would not be the same campus without you.As we begin the 2018–19 academic year, I want you to know I am here to support you, advocate for you and connect you to the right resources to help you succeed. From working with our graduate student career development advisors to supporting your health and wellness, there are many resources available to you as a student. These comprehensive support services are here to help you navigate campus, stay healthy, find opportunities to meet new people and ultimately support you in your academic journey. I encourage you to use them.Remember that we all stand behind you—your family, friends, supporters and the entire CU Boulder community—and are pulling for your success. We hope you have a great and productive semester!Sandy Jones Dean of StudentsCategories:Leadership CornerCampus Communitylast_img read more

With COVID-19 exacerbating the threat of superbugs, researchers ID new weapon

first_img“This is the first study to show that you can target a Gram-negative bacteria’s inner membrane by exploiting the innate immune response of the host,” Detweiler said.In laboratory and rodent experiments, JD1 reduced the survival and spread of Gram-negative bacteria called Salmonella enterica by 95%.But while it damaged the bacterial cell membranes, it couldn’t penetrate the fine layer of cholesterol that lined its mammalian host’s cell membranes.“Bacteria are vulnerable to JD1 in a way that our cells are not,” said Detweiler, noting that for this reason, side-effects would likely be minimal.Further studies are underway to explore JD1 and other compounds like it.Meanwhile, Detweiler has formed a spin-off company to help commercialize other compounds that work by inhibiting pumps, called “efflux pumps,” that bacteria use to pump out antibiotics.“The reality is, evolution is way smarter than all of the scientists put together and these bacteria will continue to evolve to resist what we throw at them,” she said. “We cannot rest on our laurels. We have to keep feeding the pipeline.”Categories:Health & SocietyNews Headlines Published: Dec. 23, 2020 • By Lisa Marshall Corrie Detweiler, a professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology, eyes some samples in the lab. (Photo: CU Boulder)As scientists around the globe wage war against a novel, deadly virus, one CU Boulder lab is working on new weapons to battle a different microbial threat: a rising tide of antibiotic-resistant bacteria which, if left unchecked, could kill an estimated 10 million people annually by 2050.“The COVID-19 situation is definitely putting us at risk for increasing resistance to antibiotics, so it’s more important now than ever that we come up with alternative treatments,” said Corrie Detweiler, a professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology who has spent her career seeking those alternatives.In a paper published Dec. 18 in the journal PLOS Pathogens, Detweiler and her research team unveil their latest discovery—a chemical compound that works with a host’s innate immune response to push past cellular barriers that help bacteria resist antibiotics.Along with their other recently published discoveries, the authors say, the finding could lead to a new arsenal for fighting what could be the next big public health threat.“If we don’t solve the problem of finding new antibiotics or somehow making old antibiotics work again, we are going to see sharply increasing deaths from bacterial infections we thought we had beaten decades ago,” said Detweiler. “This study offers a totally new approach and could point the way toward new drugs that work better and have fewer side effects.”In the United States alone, 35,000 people die annually from bacterial infections that could not be treated because they’ve grown resistant to existing drugs. Countless others suffer life-threatening bouts with once-easily treatable illnesses like strep throat, urinary tract infections and pneumonia. By 2050, the authors note, there could be more deaths from antibiotic resistance than from cancer.“As our existing antibiotics adapt and work less, we risk essentially going back to a period 100 years ago, when even a minor infection could mean death,” said Detweiler.The pandemic has shone even more light on the problem, she notes, as many patients die not from the virus itself but from hard-to-treat secondary bacterial infections.Meanwhile, she and other scholars worry that heightened use of antibiotics to prevent or treat those secondary infections, while at times necessary, may be exacerbating resistance.“Fragile healthcare systems in many parts of the world may not withstand the COVID-19 pandemic if also faced with a substantial increase in antimicrobial resistance,” wrote the authors of an editorial in the British Medical Journal in November.A new arsenal for an evolving warMost antibiotics in use today were developed in the 1950s, and pharmaceutical companies have since scaled back on research in the field in favor of more profitable ventures.To feed the pipeline, Detweiler’s lab developed a technique called SAFIRE for screening for new small molecules, which work differently than older drugs.Of 14,400 candidates screened from a library of existing chemicals, SAFIRE identified 70 that hold promise.The new paper centers around “JD1,” which appears to be particularly effective at infiltrating what are known as “Gram-negative bacteria.”With a tough exterior membrane that prevents antibiotics from accessing the cell, and another interior membrane providing a buffer, these bacteria (including Salmonella and E. coli) are inherently difficult to treat.But unlike other drugs, JD1 takes advantage of the host’s initial immune assault on that outer bacterial membrane, then slips inside and goes after the inner membrane too. Professor Corrie Detweiler in her lab at CU Boulder Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

Purple Heart Wines Hosts Military Veterans and Congressional Wine Caucus

first_imgFacebook Email Twitter Linkedin Home Industry News Releases Purple Heart Wines Hosts Military Veterans and Congressional Wine CaucusIndustry News ReleasesWine BusinessPurple Heart Wines Hosts Military Veterans and Congressional Wine CaucusBy Press Release – February 28, 2017 165 0 TAGSConsumerPurple Heart Wines AdvertisementWinemaker, Veteran Ray Coursen to Present Wine to Congressman and Guests on Capitol HillWashington D.C., February 28th 2017 — C. Mondavi & Family in conjunction with the Military Veterans Caucus and Congressional Wine Caucus are proud to be presenting Purple Heart Wines (purpleheartwines.com/) from Napa Valley on March 1st, 2017 in Washington D.C. The cause-worthy wine brand will be sharing the latest 2014 vintage with members of congress, media and guests of honor from the Purple Heart Foundation, including Purple Heart recipient and Chairman of the Board Bill Wroolie. Congressional Wine Caucus Co-Chair, Congressman and Purple Heart recipient Mike Thompson of California’s 5th district, which includes Napa Valley, will also be in attendance. Winemaker and Vietnam Veteran Ray Coursen will present the wine at the event and will discuss his dedication to Purple Heart Wines and his commitment to veterans’ issues.A label produced under C. Mondavi & Family, Purple Heart Wines pays tribute to American military veterans through support of the Purple Heart Foundation, an organization dedicated to serving the unmet needs of military men, women and families. While visiting Washington D.C., Coursen will present a $10,000 check donation to the Purple Heart Foundation for a total of $30,000 donated by Purple Heart Wines in the 12 months since the brand’s launch in March 2016. “I am thrilled to be in Washington D.C. this week to raise a glass of Purple Heart Red Blend with some of my fellow veterans,” comments Ray Coursen. “I hope this wine inspires others to stop and think about the sacrifices our nation’s servicemen and women have made to protect our freedoms.” Purple Heart Wines has enjoyed significant success in its first year including a sold-out 2013 vintage, the addition of a second winemaker in summer 2016 with Iraq War Veteran David Grega, increased production for the 2014 Purple Heart Red and top scores and accolades from national press. In addition to support for the Purple Heart Foundation, the brand pays tribute to the tradition of military service at C. Mondavi & Family and honors the late Peter Mondavi Sr., a veteran of World War II. About Purple Heart Wines Purple Heart is a Napa Valley red wine crafted by accomplished military veteran winemakers under the stewardship of the Peter Mondavi Sr. Family, whose patriarch is a proud veteran of World War II. It was created in collaboration with the Purple Heart Foundation to support the many needs of brave service men and women returning home. The Purple Heart is a congressional military decoration, awarded to members of the armed forces of the U.S. who are wounded by an instrument of war in the hands of the enemy. No military award better symbolizes the bravery, determination and selflessness of the military men and women serving our country. It is this noble medal that inspired the creation of Purple Heart Wines. In partnership with the Military Order of the Purple Heart, the winery makes an annual financial contribution to the Purple Heart Foundation to help them achieve their mission.Advertisement Pinterest ReddIt Share Previous articleSpring Is in the Air – Celebration of Persian New Year Art Exhibit at Madrigal’s Sausalito Wine Tasting GalleryNext articleCraftBeer.com Presents: Great American Beer Bars Press Releaselast_img read more