Assistant Professor of Biology – Tenure Track

first_imgPosition Information Other Special Skills, Abilities, and Knowledge Closing Date Position Purpose Pay RatePer faculty salary model Computer Skills FTE1.0 Position Number998225 ClassificationFaculty Special Skills, Abilities, and Knowledge:Attention to detail, Communication skills, including oral,written, and/or nonverbal, Knowledge of a University environmentpreferred, Human Relations/Interpersonal skills, Ability to managemultiple concurrent projects and meet deadlines, Maintainconfidentiality The University of Central Missouri’s Biology Program is seekingapplicants for a tenure-track position of Assistant Professor ofBiology with a preferred start date of Fall 2021 (Spring 2022 startdate may also be considered). This position includes teaching,research, and service. Teaching responsibilities will include acourse at all levels of departmental curriculum, including but notlimited to a course in human physiology, animal physiology, and agraduate course in the candidate’s area of expertise. Thedevelopment of an externally funded, collaborative research programinvolving undergraduate and graduate students is expected. Thecandidate will also be expected to help academically advise biologystudents, supervise internships, serve on university committees,and participate in curriculum development as needed. The successfulcandidate will complement existing departmental strengths byutilizing expertise in physiological techniques, and any relevantmolecular and cellular tools, to address research questions thatimpact human health or wildlife biology. The candidate will haveaccess to renovated teaching spaces for instruction and can extendthe classroom through research in a recently remodeled laboratoryfacility, an animal care facility, a wildlife research lab, orPertle Springs Wildlife and Recreation Area. Working TitleAssistant Professor of Biology – Tenure Track Working hours: To Apply: Candidates must complete an on-line faculty profile foundat https://jobs.ucmo.edu/ and apply to position 998225.Candidates should submit the following documentation:1. A cover letter that outlines the applicant’s interest,qualifications, and experience for the position.2. Teaching and mentoring philosophy (including evidence ofteaching effectiveness).3. Research plan.4. A curriculum vitae.5. Unofficial undergraduate and graduate transcripts.6. Names, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses of three professionalreferences. This is completed within the faculty profile.Letters of recommendation and official undergraduate and graduatetranscripts showing degree completions will be required later inthe search process.Review of applications begins April 11, 2021 and continues untilthe position is filled. The preferred starting date for thisappointment is August 2, 2021 (Fall 2021 semester), but a Spring2022 semester starting date may also be considered. This is a9-month appointment. Direct inquiries regarding this position to:Dr. Aaron Geheber, Search Committee Chair, telephone (660) 543-8291or e-mail: [email protected] : A background check is required for the selected candidate ofthis position and any job offer is contingent on the results ofthis check.The University of Central Missouri is an Equal Opportunity Employerand specifically invites applications from women, minorities,veteran status and people with disabilities. Posting Date04/11/2021 Physical & Environmental Factors: Bargaining UnitNocenter_img Position TitleAssistant Professor Experience Other Education & Formal Training Work LocationWarrensburg Campus Special Instructions to Applicants: Open Until FilledYes Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*).Required DocumentsRequired DocumentsCover LetterTranscriptsVitaeTeaching Philosophy StatementResearch StatementOptional Documents Ability to Keyboard Education & Formal TrainingDoctorate degree (Specify field(s) of study below) Department220710-Biology and Agriculture Professional faculty hours FLSAExempt Special Working Conditions: Required Qualifications:1. Record of peer-reviewed publication addressing researchquestions in the field of physiology.2. Demonstration of clear written and oral communication, as wellas organizational skills.3. Experience working effectively with people from diversebackgrounds.Preferred Qualifications:1. University/College teaching experience.2. Experience teaching physiology to human health students.3. Evidence of involvement in extramural funded research.4. Evidence of assessment knowledge and experience utilizingactive-learning strategies in the classroom.5. Interest in advising student organizations.6. Postdoctoral experience. PhD degree in Physiology, or a related area from an accreditedinstitution; ABD will be considered, but the PhD degree must becompleted by the start date.last_img read more

Concerned Facebook Community Prevents Soldier’s Suicide

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreOn October 24th, Michael Cali Moore, a National Guardsman, sent “Dan,” the anonymous founder of the Facebook page “Awesome Sh*t My Drill Sergeant Said” a message concerning his Battle Buddy, a Guardsman in another platoon:“I don’t know where else to turn. I’m 100% certain that my friends is planning on killing himself tonight and I cannot get a hold of him or anyone that can get to him. Can you help me?” he wrote, adding details of his friend’s personal and financial woes.The answer turned out to be yes.(READ the full story from Yahoo News)Thanks to Julia Frerichs, LMT for submitting the story!AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Oral Tracey | Creativity, oh creativity, where art thou?

first_imgWhile doing some preseason analysis for the upcoming English Premier League season with my co-host on the morning sports discussion show ‘Sports Explosion’ on Hitz 92 FM this past week, in looking at the chances for my EPL team Liverpool, I expressed the opinion that the most urgent need for Liverpool is a creative midfielder. One who will offer the spontaneous skills needed to unlock organised and stingy defensive teams, a view that is obviously not shared by manager Jurgen Klopp, who apparently trusts his system of play as executed by his current band of hard workers over the potential volatility of more creativity. I have long been a consistent and unofficial champion for the creative element in the game of football. I remember vividly former Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho taking his then creative genius Eden Hazard to task for not doing enough defending for the team, a move which sparked the beginning of the end for the now unemployed Jose. There have been several discussions and debates with numerous local football coaches and officials, at my prompting, about the undervaluing of creative players in Jamaican football. As far back as Jamaica’s historic Word Cup qualification for the World Cup Finals in 1998, there was a running conflict between ‘skill merchant’ and crowd favourite Walter ‘Blacka Pearl’ Boyd and the Brazilian coach Rene Simoes. The generation following Boyd was coloured by the case of Jermaine ‘Maestro’ Hue, arguably the best passer and midfield visionary of this generation, who, despite his unique and exquisite game-changing qualities, was always on the fringes of the Jamaican national team. The conversations on this issue with current Reggae Boyz head coach Theodore ‘Tappa’ Whitmore have been countless. Tinged with the irony that Whitmore himself was one of the major creative forces in that 1998 team, ‘Tappa’ is yet to bite the bait, that it is the lack of creative players in the current team why the Boyz seem incapable of doing something as basic, as keep possession of the ball, and even more fundamentally, were struggling to create quality chances. Tappa’s consistent response was from the playbook – most of the local creative players that the Jamaican public is clamoring for are unfit, unprofessional, and lazy. They do not do enough off the ball, and often end up as liabilities rather than assets for the team. The fact of the matter is that with creativity and adventure, comes a higher level of risk of turnovers and defensive lapses, and most coaches are under pressure to get results and keep their jobs, and thus prefer to go for the all-round utility player, who will work their socks off for the team without taking too many risks. Balancing act It is indeed a balancing act between attacking enterprise and conservative pragmatism. General conservatism seems to be winning out, which is effectively marginalising and destroying the players with a creative propensity. Getting lost in this approach is the simple but fundamental fact that a goal saved or denied, is no more valuable than a goal created or scored. Ideally, every coach and every team would love to have the full package in creative players, who also put in the dirty work at both ends of the pitch. The fact is, though, that very few individual players come in that total package. The innate nature of creativity and flair leave these players vulnerable to mistakes. They have thus become a high-risk component and easy scapegoats, a reality that puts creative players under clear and present danger. Ironically and instructively, the man widely regarded as the best football coach in world football today, Josep ‘Pep’ Guardiola, has built and continues to build his success with teams dominated by armies of creative and attacking players.last_img read more

Kroger supermarket chain says profits up but slowed by unrest

first_imgAnalysts surveyed by Thomson Financial predicted earnings of 48 cents per share on sales of $20.4 billion. Analysts typically exclude one-time items in their forecasts. Sales at Kroger stores open at least a year, considered a key indicator of a retailer’s success, were up 6 percent in the quarter. Not counting fuel sales, same-store sales rose 5.2 percent. The company said profit margins in the quarter also were hurt by about a 2 percent rise in product costs and that consumers can expect some higher prices. Prices for milk, cheese, corn, wheat and oranges and some other fruit have been rising nationally for reasons including bad weather, higher costs for livestock feed and for transportation. Some pizza chains have raised the prices of cheese pizzas because of the dairy increase and consumers face price increases in a variety of other areas. Some industry analysts have said price increases could benefit grocers by boosting revenue. The reduced margins, labor uncertainty and a recent run-up in shares made for an off-day for Kroger stock with shares sliding 6.7 percent, or $2, to $27.66. Kroger stock recently reached a 52-week high of $31.94, after trading as low as $20.10 nearly one year ago. Kroger, which competes for grocery sales against nonunion Wal-Mart Stores Inc. supercenters, also is negotiating new contracts with union workers in Seattle and Toledo, Ohio, as well as in Southern California. Workers there have voted to authorize a strike by their union if stalled negotiations with Kroger’s Ralphs and two other chains fail. A work stoppage in Southern California four years ago disrupted business for several months at Ralphs stores. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! CINCINNATI – Kroger Co., the nation’s largest traditional supermarket chain, said Tuesday that first-quarter profit jumped 10 percent but was slowed by labor unrest and rising costs for dairy and some produce items. Its shares sank nearly 7 percent. For the three months ended May 26, Kroger made $336.6 million, or 47 cents per share, compared with $306.4 million, or 42 cents per share, a year earlier. Sales rose 7 percent, to $20.73 billion from $19.42 billion. Kroger, with a tense labor situation in Southern California, said its first-quarter earnings included charges of about 2 cents per share stemming from a two-day walkout by some 700 workers at a distribution center near Louisville, Ky., that two companies operate for Kroger. First-quarter 2006 results included a one-time legal expense of 3 cents per share. last_img read more