Quiñahan tells NLEX players: Tough love from Guiao is normal

first_imgMOST READ Luis Manzano jokes about Mikee Morada’s proposal to Alex Gonzaga: ‘Baka nagtali lang ng sintas’ Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Palace: Crisis over ABS-CBN franchise unlikely Football’s next kick Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Ben&Ben, IV of Spades, SB19 win big at 5th Wish Music Awards Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netJR Quiñahan admits he felt weird playing against coach Yeng Guiao on Friday.“Nakakapanibago lang na nasa kabila si coach (It was a new feeling that coach is on the opposite side.),” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Anne Curtis talks about renewing faith in God amid the world’s ‘noise and clutter’ Admittedly missing Guiao’s tough love, Quiñahan offered advice to NLEX, saying they shouldn’t be discouraged with the mentor’s harsh words.“It’s normal. If he shouts at you, at least he loves you. Him yelling is his way of showing that he cares.”Under the fiery mentor for so long, Quiñahan and Guiao parted ways in the offseason when the mentor went to NLEX while the Cebuano big man was traded by Rain or Shine to GlobalPort.Moving on, Quiñahan is happy that he’s become a vital cog in the Batang Pier’s campaign this 2017 PBA Philippine Cup, as the team remains in the running for that coveted top two spot.“We want every game to be important. We’re aiming to get to the top if we’re lucky. For us, you just have to follow coach’s system. There’s no jealousy here and we’re just helping each other.”ADVERTISEMENT Bulacan inmates, jail guards raise donations for Taal victims Their new teams battled for the first time with GlobalPort topping NLEX, 110-96. Quiñahan’s squad improved to a joint second place and pushed Guiao’s side down the cellar anew.The Cebuano big man got 18 points and seven rebounds in the win against his former coach as he helped the Batang Pier move up to a 5-3 card.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnQuiñahan shared that he tried to shake Guiao’s hand after the game but failed as the coach made a quick exit after the Road Warriors’ frustrating loss. But he understands it’s all business, admitting he still gets a chance to talk to the fiery mentor from time-to-time.“We’re texting,” he said. GlobalPort faces San Miguel next Saturday in Lapu-Lapu City in Cebu.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next DILG to lock shops in Tagaytay City, other areas near Taal Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board member Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite View commentslast_img read more

USAID FED Boosts Rice Production

first_imgThe United States Agency for International Development Food Enterprise Development (USAID FED) for the past four years has increased capacities of local farmers in the country to produce more crops, especially the country’ staple food, rice.Since its inception in the country, USAID-FED agricultural program has empowered over 50,000 farmers who are now operating 10,630 hectares of farmland. The program operates in four value chains, namely rice, cassava, vegetables and goats.In an exclusive interview, Chief of Party of USAID FED Madam Agnes Luz said within the four value chains in which her organization is operating, the rice sector has improved immensely.She mentioned Fabrar Rice Processing Industry as an outcome of USAID FED that her organization has supported to empower local farmers by marketing their produce to add value by processing the locally grown rice as a means to cut down the expense of imported rice.She said during the beginning of USAID FED five year project in 2013, the number of farmers was very low. “In 2013, there were only 7,880 farmers operating on 2,157 hectares of farmland, but the number later grew up to 20,000 farmers with 3,915 hectares in 2014 and has increased immensely in 2015 to 50,500 farmers and 10,630 hectares of improve seed rice and the sale of rice also increase to $1.2M,” Madam Luz added.As a means of responding to farmers’ plea for a safe plant, she said, USAID FED has built nine rice business hubs (6,800 MT/yr additional milling capacity , 1500M3 additional storage) responsible to keep the produce of farmers fresh, 30 power tillers and 1-2 warehouses .“Our responsibility at USAID FED is to increase productivity and profitability of agricultural value chains and improve human nutrition. We are proud of the farmers and we encourage others to join agriculture because very soon with the level of performance from local farmers, Liberia will export rice to other countries in the near future.”She described the rice sector as one of her successes with over 50,000 farmers into rice production which the country depends on for survival.She asserted that before the beginning of her five year project, farmers were carrying on subsistence farming for consumption and expressed joy about the efforts farmers are showing in the six counties of Lofa, Nimba, Bong, Grand Bassa, Montserrado and Margibi and promised to improve the sector.USAID FED Chief of Party also confirmed that farmers have generally benefitted from the provision of hand tools, better quality rice planting materials and training that have improved their knowledge and skills in the technology of farming.She pledged her organization’s commitment to continue empowering and improving the lives of farmers by ensuring that farmers in Liberia export food to other countries like the United States of America, France and other countries to boost agriculture production in the country. She said farmers keep demonstrating their willingness to grow their own food but need the Liberian government to make their work more effective by establishing centers that will be able to keep the products safe when harvested.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

A fairy tale come true

first_imgSpeech by former president FW de Klerk on 8 September 2010, Pestana Chelsea bridge hotel, london.“The legacy of the first African world cup – let’s make sure it’s just the beginning”.Six years ago the Fairy Godmother – in the guise of Sepp Blatter – waved a magic wand, and announced that South Africa had been chosen to host the 2010 FIFA World Cup. For the first time in history, Africa – the Cinderella continent – had been chosen to host the world’s premier sporting event.Mind you, had it not been for a little legerdemain and the mysterious voting of the FIFA representative from Oceana, South Africa – and not Germany – would have hosted the preceding World Cup in 2006. President Nelson Mandela who had attended the announcement in 1999 with great expectations, remarked laconically “Ah well… there evidently were some aspects of the end game that we South Africans did not fully understand.”So, in the 2004 announcement, it was Africa’s turn. Sepp Blatter had all but promised that no more ugly first-world stepsisters would be permitted to jump the queue.From that moment the countdown started.Would South Africa be able to make the grade?Would an African country actually be able to deliver a top class world event?Would we be able to turn our third world pumpkins and mice into of the glittering stadiums, airports and infrastructure that the event would require?The world was skeptical. We heard again the old familiar choruses that precede all major global sporting events, wherever they are held: The stadiums would not be ready; security was inadequate; the infra-structure of airports, railways and roads would simply not be able to cope.The skepticism continued right until the eve of the event. In May this year YouGovStone, on behalf of SABMiller, carried out research among its network of influential people to establish their views on the coming event. The results were, to say the very least, discouraging:Only 29% of those polled thought that the World Cup in South Africa would be a great success;58% expected that there would be problems with security;57% thought that there would be transport and logistics problems; and59% thought that the average South African would not benefit from the event.Most South Africans, on the other hand, had little doubt about our ability to hold a successful World Cup. After all, we had already hosted very successful Rugby and Cricket World Cups in 1995 and 2003. In 2009 – at the drop of a hat – we had been able to step into the breach and host India’s wildly popular 20/20 Cricket Competition after the security situation in India had made it necessary to move the event.The fact is that one of South Africa’s strengths is its ability to manage large projects. We have excellent – and highly competitive – civil engineering companies that successfully participate in and manage large projects all over the world.If anything, South Africans were a little too optimistic. One of our leading real estate companies provided advice to home owners on how they could convert their homes into B&Bs and make fortunes during the four weeks of the World Cup. As a result, hundreds of expectant homeowners built luxury guest suites and waited forlornly for bookings that never came. Small entrepreneurs seriously overestimated the number of visitors who would come to South Africa for the event.Restaurateurs geared up for a bumper season – but most were deeply disappointed: not only did international crowds not descend on their eateries, their regular South African customers also stayed away in droves because for a whole month they were glued to their TV screens watching soccer!Despite all this, Danny Jordaan, the Chairman of the local organizing committee, and his team made steady progress.Magnificent new stadiums were built – and old ones were renovated and refurbished.New highways and rapid transit systems were constructed.South Africa’s major airports were vastly expanded and modernized. After years of being cocooned in hoardings and scaffolds, Cape Town’s new international airport emerged just before the World Cup like a gigantic crystal butterfly.In our major cities large clocks counted down the days to the opening match on 11 June.Our leading companies jumped onto the bandwagon and helped to sweep up national support. Government, opposition, religious and civil society leaders embraced one another and exhorted the nation to make a success of the event. Unprecedented security arrangements were made and special courts were established to dispense swift justice to law-breakers.In the process, South Africans also learned that the FIFA fairy godmother was not motivated solely by altruism. She made it clear that she – and she alone – would choose Cinderella’s ball gown and accessories. Apparently unconcerned about any practical implications, Sepp Blatter insisted that the Cape Town Stadium should be built in Green Point – because he thought it would look pretty with Table Mountain as its backdrop. The City would rather have upgraded the existing Newlands Stadium – or built a new stadium at Culembourg, close to existing rail and road routes. However, FIFA was adamant that it would either be Green Point – or there would be no games in Cape Town at all.Most of the accessories – including the flags, vuvuzelas and even Zumi, the World Cup mascot, were manufactured in Asia. Companies that were not official FIFA sponsors were prohibited from displaying their wares or advertising anywhere near the games. Our stadiums were suddenly flooded with American Budweiser beer – a virtually unknown product – and our own excellent Castle Lager was nowhere in sight.Nevertheless, it worked.For a glorious month South Africans laid down the burden of our divided history and joined one another in a magnificent national festival.The noise of our divisive national debate – of the Julius Malemas and right wing extremists – was drowned out by the discordant but joyous blare of the Vuvuzela.The only colours that were important were the colours of the South African flag. Hundreds of thousands of South Africans festooned their cars, taxis and trucks with the national flag.Enterprising university students developed and marketed socks, emblazoned with the flags of participating nations, that fitted snuggly over car wing mirrors.We celebrated wildly when, against all expectations, Bafana Bafana drew against Mexico. We commiserated with one another when we lost to Uruguay and had to exit the competition. Nevertheless, despite our 83rd ranking we did quite well and performed better than many other countries – including France – that were much higher up the international ladder.Once we had been knocked out, South Africans switched their allegiance whole-heartedly and without reservation to Africa’s best remaining hope, Ghana. Black South Africans were surprised that nearly all whites identified with Africa – with Baghana, Baghana – rather than with England or some other European country.When Ghana sadly – and unluckily – left the fray, many black South Africans returned the compliment and supported Holland, because of its historic ties to many of their white compatriots. Such were the times and such was the spirit that animated our people for that magic month in the depth of the southern winter.But as with all fairy tales the clock struck twelve.Cinderella had to scurry down the palace steps, and confront again the harsh realities of our national life. The party was over. The bunting was removed. Our national attention shifted from the empty stadiums to the continuing poverty and inequality in which too many South Africans continue to live. The vuvuzelas were silent. Strident voices again began to dominate the national discourse.Nevertheless, during those four weeks we had successfully changed international perceptions of our country. It was clear from another survey carried out by YouGovStone on behalf of SABMiller in August 2010 that there had been a major and positive shift in attitudes toward South Africa. The survey revealed thatfully 72% believed that the World Cup would have a very positive or positive legacy for South Africa – compared to only the 29% of those polled before the event, who had thought it would be a success.54% thought that it would bring great benefits to South Africa.61% said that, as a result of the success of the World Cup, they thought that South Africa would be a good place to hold global events of all kinds.42% felt more positive about visiting South Africa as a tourist.Unfortunately, since then we South Africans have been attracting attention for all the wrong reasons. On the soccer field of international opinion we have been resolutely scoring one own goal after another.First came the Protection of Information Bill that would give government broad powers to classify virtually any information regarding its activities in the “national interest”. The effect would be to stop whistle-blowers and investigative journalists from trying to obtain and publish information on government corruption and inefficiency.Then came ANC proposals for the establishment of a Media Appeals Tribunal that would ensure “responsible” and “balanced” reporting by the press and that would lay down stiff penalties – including prison sentences – for recalcitrant journalists.This was followed by reports of a new system of land ownership which would cap the rights of South Africans to own freehold property and that would require all new foreign landowners to have local South African partners.During the past few weeks we have witnessed a protracted strike by relatively well-paid civil servants who are demanding salary increases twice the current rate of inflation. All this threatens to send the government deficit over 7% of GDP.Alas, the silly season continues. Julius Malema continues to bellow about the nationalization of the mines. President Zuma and the ANC – with a weather eye on international credit ratings – continue to insist that this is not their policy. The increasingly divergent factions within the ANC Alliance continue to circle one another, hurling insults, before the ANC’s important National General Council later this month.The situation is back to normal.Cinderella is back in the kitchen, sitting on the ash-heap. The FIFA fairy godmother has flown off to her next assignment in Brazil – weighed down by almost two hundred million dollars in profits. The Afro-pessimists have returned in strength, confident that South Africa’s World Cup success was just a flash in the pan.However, we South Africans have always been much more realistic than that.We did not expect that the World Cup would change the underlying realities of South Africa – and it did not.It did not have much impact on poverty and inequality.It did not resolve the issues of race and class that have dominated our national discourse for hundreds of years.It did not bring the scourges of AIDS and crime to an end.Anyone who expected such outcomes would really have to believe in fairy tales.However, by the same token, all these developments have not seriously undermined the strengths that made the World Cup success possible.We South Africans are remarkably resilient and have a wonderful ability to confound the pessimists. Most foreigners who have visited our shores since 1652 have confidently predicted that the country could not possibly work. But we have proved them wrong.Nobody in 1985 thought that we ourselves would be able to end apartheid and find a peaceful solution to the spiraling conflict in our society. Yet we did.After 1994 Afro-pessimists doubted that a black ANC government would possibly be able to run a sophisticated economy. But for sixteen years it has done so – and achieved uninterrupted economic growth for thirteen of those years until bankers in the northern hemisphere upset the global economic apple cart.I am confident that we will once again prove the pessimists wrong.I do not believe for a moment that the ANC will be successful with its current assault on the media. The Protection of Information Bill will be withdrawn or satisfactorily amended; and the Media Appeals Tribunal will be shelved.The current proposals relating to land tenure will wither in the light of national and international economic scrutiny. Our farmers, together with government, will hammer out a workable approach to land reform.The ANC will successfully resolve the divisions within its Alliance. Or even better, it will split and open the way to national politics based on social and economic policies rather than on race.And South Africa will retain the Rugby World Cup next year. Just you wait and see!The glorious weeks of the FIFA World Cup are receding further and further into our collective memory – but some things will remain,Including our ability to compete with the best in the world;Including the world-class infrastructure that was created for the event; andIncluding the natural beauty and the warmth and hospitality of our people that the World Cup has introduced to hundreds of millions of potential tourists.As we all know, Cinderella, in her headlong flight down the palace steps, left something of her magic behind in the form of the crystal slipper that was retrieved by Prince Charming. The FIFA World Cup left us with a similar magic legacy: it is the shining vision of the brilliant, multifaceted nation we can and will become.This, I believe, is the main legacy of the World Cup: it has shown us the nation that we can become if we all unite behind a worthy vision and work together in the spirit of June/July 2010.last_img read more

Daily Wrap: Developing Hybrid HTML5 Apps May Cost Less and More

first_imgWhen Amazon’s EC2 Isn’t Potent Enough For Your Cloud HostingIf you are looking to virtualize some of your data center and host it in the cloud, you probably have heard about Amazon’s EC2 by now. But one IT shop used EC2 as a strawman to consider what they really needed from their eventual service provider. It is interesting and instructive to see the steps that WoundVision took for this process. The company produces a risk assessment software solution supported by infrared thermal imaging for early wound detection. (more) 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts Hybrid HTML5 Apps Are Less Costly to Develop Than NativeShould you develop a native app or an HTML5 app that will run on multiple platforms? A Forrester report aims to answer the question. For the cost-conscious developer, hybrid HTML5 apps provide more value than attempting to create native apps across the four major mobile platforms.From the comments: Piotr Steininger — “Having developed several hybrids now, I have to disagree with the broad statement:‘In the future we are likely to see a majority of apps built in this fashion.’I’m a veteran web developer and that includes Sproutcore and jQuery. I love web technologies. I was a huge fan of PhoneGap based apps. That is… until I went through the process of building and maintaining a several of them. Hybrid development may make sense on SOME tablet devices – namely iPad and iPad2. Even those have limitations. When it comes to Android, no animations/transforms are hardware accelerated and user experience is dismal at best (even on Honeycomb).’ (more of Piotr’s insightful comment)More Must Read Stories: A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Android App Identifies SOPA Supporters Behind Real-World ProductsThe Stop Online Piracy Act. The mere thought of the controversial Internet regulation bill passing even one house of Congress keeps you up at night. You’ve already transferred all of your domains from GoDaddy, even after they flip-flopped on their SOPA stance. You instinctively click on every anti-SOPA story on Reddit and Hacker News, voting up the best of them. On the Internet, you’ve eagerly joined the growing army of digital activists opposing the law, but what about the real world? What about when you go to the store? (more) Where Do The Leading Republican Presidential Candidates Stand On SOPA? [UPDATED]Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney sounds like a guy who really, really wants to oppose the Stop Online Piracy Act and its Senate counterpart, the Protect IP Act.But Romney just can’t bring himself to mention SOPA by name. (more) Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… robyn tippins Flurry: Mobile App Usage Begins to Far Outpace the Web Thanks to FacebookWhen technology pundits say mobile is exploding, many people just shrug and say “of course.” Many people might not fully comprehend just how big mobile is growing and the enormous ecosystem that it now encompasses. Mobile computing through smartphones and tablets is growing four times faster than the PC and Internet evolutions of the 1980’s and 90’s. People are now using mobile apps more than the Web and the gap continues to widen. (more)Keep up with ReadWriteWeb by subscribing to our RSS feed or email newsletter. You can also follow ReadWriteWeb across the web on Google+, Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#community#web A Beginner’s Guide to TwitterMany of ReadWriteWeb’s readers are old hands at Twitter, but the service gets thousands of new users every day. That includes a lot of folks who suddenly need to use Twitter as part of their job. If you’re just being introduced to the joys of Twitter (or introducing it to another user), here’s a short and friendly primer on what you need to know about using the site. (more) CES 2012: The Convergence of TV and Mobile PlatformsAnybody with a passing interest in the headlines pouring out of the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas cannot help but identify one major theme: 2012 is the year that the TV will converge with mobile platforms. For all of the talk that CES has lost its clout, it is still a good source for identifying trends that will drive the innovation of major technology companies in the new year. Last year tablets and dual-core processors were all the rage. This year, developers have something bigger on their minds.?? (more) Tweet At ‘Em All You Want, But Gen Y’s Are Still More Influenced By Word-of-Mouth MarketingA new report out from Sitel on social media and consumer trends implies that social media is key to reaching Gen Y (those born between 1980 and 2000), but the numbers don’t add up. While the Gen Y, or people born between 1980-2000, are in fact “digital natives,” that doesn’t mean they are actually most reachable via social media marketing. (more) You Are What You Like (And Not What Your Friends Like) On Facebook [STUDY]Students who share certain tastes in movies and music – but not in books – are more likely to friend each other on Facebook, according to a study released in November that has been getting attention in academic circles. (more) Forrester: As Growth Slows, Apple to Be More Influential than Cloud in 2012A devastating assessment of the course of technology growth last Friday from technology analyst Forrester flies in the face of what competitive firms would consider “conventional wisdom,” to say that before cloud computing truly commands the attention of enterprise network architects, a few other dramas currently in progress must play themselves out first. (more) Forrester asserts that hybrid HTML5 apps are less expensive to develop than native apps. This and more in today’s Daily Wrap.Sometimes it’s difficult to catch every story that hits tech media in a day, so we wrap up some of the most talked about stories. We give you a daily recap of what you missed in the ReadWriteWeb Community, including a link to some of the most popular discussions in our offsite communities on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+ as well. last_img read more

Georgia Expands Less Developed Area Hiring Credit

first_imgGeorgia expanded the hiring tax credit for business enterprises in less developed areas. Businesses in a county that contains a federal military installation are now eligible. The installation must have:– at least 5,000 federal or military personnel combined; and– contain an industrial park that a governmental entity owns and operates.Act 378 (H.B. 843), Laws 2018, effective July 1, 2018Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img

Nidahas Trophy: Shakib Al Hasan ruled out, Mahmudullah to lead Bangladesh

first_imgIn a huge blow for Bangladesh ahead of the upcoming T20I tri-series in Sri Lanka, skipper Shakib Al Hasan has been ruled out of the tournament due to a hand injury.Vice-captain Mahmudullah Riyad was picked to lead the side in the Nidahas Trophy. Batsman Liton Das was named in the squad as a replacement for Shakib.The star all-rounder was earlier included in the 16-man squad for the upcoming tournament as the board hoped Shakib would recover in time for the tournament but the BCB announced on Saturday that the cricketer has failed to recover from the injury.Shakib had injured his left hand during the final of the one-day international tri-series at home against Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe in January, and has been out of action since.Bangladesh squad for the Nidahas Trophy 2018. Shakib Al Hasan has been ruled out due to injury. Mahmudullah to lead the side. pic.twitter.com/1kgMWn13MnBangladesh Cricket (@BCBtigers) March 3, 2018Shakib, who has featured in 61 T20Is, has 1223 runs against his name, along with 73 wickets and is one of the most sought-after players in the format worldwide.The Nidahas Trophy will also include Sri Lanka and India, who will play the tournament opener on March 6.The tournament, being hosted to celebrate 70 years of Sri Lanka’s independence, will be held in Colombo from March 6-18.Squad: Mahmudullah (c), Tamim Iqbal, Soumya Sarkar, Imrul Kayes, Mushfiqur Rahim (wk), Sabbir Rahman, Mustafizur Rahman, Rubel Hossain, Taskin Ahmed, Abu Haider Rony, Abu Jahed, Ariful Haque, Mehidy Hasan, Nurul Hasan, Nazmul Islam, Liton Das.advertisementlast_img read more

G E Shipping to Buy Gas Carrier Oldie

first_imgzoom India-based Great Eastern Shipping Company Limited (G E Shipping) has decided to expand its fleet with a secondhand medium gas carrier. The company signed a contract with an undisclosed seller to buy the 36,567 cbm ship.As informed, the 1996-built vessel is expected to join G E Shipping’s fleet in Q1 FY19.In September 2017, the company also acquired a secondhand medium gas carrier Gas Columbia that was renamed Jag Vijaya.What is more, Great Eastern bought earlier this month a very large gas carrier, British Councillor, according to data provided by VesselsValue.The company’s current fleet stands at 47 vessels, comprising 32 tankers and 15 dry bulk carriers with an average age of 10.37 years aggregating 3.88 million dwt.last_img

Olivia Wilde CoHosts Courage In Journalism Awards

first_imgOn Tuesday night, Olivia Wilde and Glamour Magazine’s Editor-in-Chief, Cindi Leive co-hosted the International Wome’s Media Foundation 2013 Courage in Journalism Awards honoring Najiba Ayub, Bopha Phorn, Nour Kelze and Edna Machirori (Lifetime Achievement Award Winner).In addition, Los Angeles Times National Editor, Kim Murphy, presented a tribute to “1998 Courage Award” winner Elizabeth Neuffer who died in Iraq in 2003.Additional celebrity presenters included Bo Derek and John Corbett (who presented to Bopha Phorn), Marcia Gay Harden (who presented to Nour Kelze), Maria Shriver (who presented to Edna Machirori) and Gayle Tzemach Lemmon (who presented to Najiba Ayub) with additional notable guests including Lubov Azria and Omarosa Manigault.The Courage in Journalism Awards honored women journalists who have shown extraordinary strength of character and integrity while reporting the news under dangerous or difficult circumstances.The 2013 honorees included: Najiba Ayubi, 45, a news director from Afghanistan who has spent more than a decade working under anonymous threats and attacks from government entities; Nour Kelze, 25, a Syrian photojournalist who occupies the front lines of the conflict in her country, documenting the human cost of the Syrian revolution and Bopha Phorn, 28, a Cambodian newspaper reporter whose coverage of crime, land rights abuses and human rights issues have led to attempts on her life. The IWMF Lifetime Achievement Award went to Edna Machirori, the first black female newspaper editor in Zimbabwe.Bank of America was the National Presenting Sponsor for the 8th consecutive year; with Chevron as the West Coast Presenting Sponsor. This year’s Media Sponsor was the Los Angeles Times.To find out more information about the International Women’s Media Foundation please follow the organization on twitter @IWMF or click here.last_img read more